October, 2007

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What Are Transfer Development Credits?

Saturday, October 27th, 2007

Lately, TDCs (Transfer Development Credits) have been in the news in our area. TDCs were devised to allow local ranchers or farmers to keep their acreage untouched, if they have property they could develop. Instead, they may take those lots and arrange to transfer the development rights to a so-called Transfer Site, through sales to developers.

Transfer Sites are areas where the County decides more development can theoretically be built without destroying the character and atmosphere of a neighborhood. The rancher/farmer sells his credits to a developer, realizing a profit from his land, and the developer then obtains the right to split a property within the Transfer Site area and build on the lots thus created.

Next Week: Who Wins, Who Loses?

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero

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Get Ready for the Building Inspector

Tuesday, October 16th, 2007

Before concrete is poured for any Project, a Building Inspector will visit the site to check the job. You should prepare for the following:
1. Have a signed Soils Report ready for him to read;
2. Any saturation of the soil in that Report will be checked;
3. He will check a stamped, approved set of drawings, which should always be ready
and accessible to all inspectors;
4. He will check the foundation plan against what is laid out in the foundation
a. Depth of footings and plate
b. Anchor bolt spacing
c. Holdown hardware
d. Shearwall lengths and placement
e. Slab steel and spacing
f. Steel slab concrete chocks to raise re-bar, for concrete to fully engulf
re-bar;
5. If any of the above is not to his satisfaction, he will leave a correction sheet
with items he feel must be corrected;
6. Usually, a telephone number is on the correction sheet, to call for re-
inspection.

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero

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Soils Reports Can Save Time & Money

Tuesday, October 9th, 2007

One of the most important parts of your construction job is the Soils Report, which is made before grading and construction begin.

A qualified Soils Engineer must investigate your site and prepare a soils report with a “perk test” added, if the project will be on a septic system. The perk test will determine the number of linear feet of the leach field required.

The report will also give you, as required by your County:

1. An expansion index, which indicates the amount of steel needed in footings and slab

2. The moisture content of the soil, which is very important to know before you pour any concrete

3. A liquefaction index, to indicate the possibility of sliding

4. Your seismic zone

The Soils Engineer will also inspect all placement of steel before pouring concrete, to assure that the local government inspector will “sign off” the inspection card under Concrete, and your job can continue.

Next Week: What Building Inspectors look for before concrete is poured

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero