City & County Regulations

...now browsing by category

 
Print This Post Print This Post


Fire Department (CDF) Impacts in San Luis Obispo County and Other, Similar Counties

Thursday, October 30th, 2008

When considering a new project – home, commercial or other type of construction – do check with your local fire department.

For example, if your property is located in a particular fire zone, which is determined by the fire department, types of construction can be required that will conform to their standards.This could affect framing, roofing, the type of glass in windows, road construction, access to property and, of course, use of fire sprinklers.

Your local fire jurisdiction could have other, far-reaching effects on your project, so check with with your local fire department agency to avoid unpleasant surprises.

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero Rinaldi AIA

Print This Post Print This Post


The Frustrations of Obtaining a Building Permit continued

Friday, August 29th, 2008

As a further note to obtaining information from a Senior Planner in your area -

Ask if there are any other environmental issues, ordinances or requirements that might impact your project. This applies whether you are considering a home on acreage, on a city lot, a commercial project, or any other category of building.

Present issues which could affect your making a decision are:
1. Environmental – ask about the issues
2. Fire sprinklers
3. Water connection fees
4. Sewer connection fees
5. Well report requirements
6. School fees
7. All the other fees that the city or county requires to obtain a building permit
8. And again – be sure to hire an Architect to check and re-check the information obtained

Most governmental agencies try to be informed, but from personal experience, I have learned that one sector sometimes doesn’t get all the information from another sector, which could affect your decision to proceed with your project.

Good luck – I hope your experience is positive!

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero

Print This Post Print This Post


Obtaining a Building Permit Can Equal Frustration

Tuesday, August 12th, 2008

Get Your Preliminary Information

It’s important to know that as a property owner, you have no real property rights when you’re developing your property. You are governed by layer upon layer of rules, regulations and ordinances: local, regional, state and federal.

It’s best, therefore, to hire a knowledgeable Architect who is familiar with all of these very restrictive laws.

Also, as a property owner requiring to build a project on your property, it’s best to check with your local Planning Department, to orient you to all of the requirements that pertain to you.

Be sure to keep complete notes of your meeting, and get the business card of the person who is giving you this information. It is best if this person is a senior planner. This is a preliminary meeting, and the information you receive about restrictions and fees can sometimes affect your decision to build or not to build.

If you would like to proceed, then you should see an Architect, who can help you with the myriad details of your project. Please feel free to contact our office, we are always more than happy to consult and help.

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero

Print This Post Print This Post


When TDCs Work

Tuesday, November 20th, 2007

TDC programs work well only when the residents of a designated Receiver Site are willing to accept the change in density in their area or neighborhood. That also typifies the democratic process. Otherwise, the process is a change in zoning made without the residents’ acquiescence.

Even though the adopted TDC program of San Luis Obispo County specifically states: “Support of the Community,” is necessary, violations of this Section persist.

Case in point: most recently, an area south of Atascadero was under consideration. Through an ad hoc committee, written surveys were sent to the property owners involved. More than 70 per cent responded, stating they wanted out of the TDC program; they wanted no community change.

The area has many problems for a greater population: substandard roads (unable to meet requirements of the greater traffic engendered); water shortages; drainage problems; need for septic systems and leach fields in spite of soils inadequacies; no natural gas available for new homes (propane or electric only); no city water (many on wells).

Still, the County Supervisors voted to make a significant modification to the zoning, from 2-1/2 acres to 2 acres. If everyone who could split his property did so, it would result in almost 100 new homes. Each of the Supervisors who voted for this change – against the advice of the Planning Commission – lives about 20 miles from the Receiver Site, and apparently not one of them had toured the area to see how it would be changed.

As a result, a community of acreages will undergo gradual change and greater impaction upon services and resources.

So, the question is: Is the TDC an effective vehicle to use existing land as an efficient environmental development tool?

Yes and No. Yes, if the involved area owners are in support of the process, and resources and services can support the increased density. Otherwise, the answer is an emphatic No.

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero

Print This Post Print This Post


What Are Transfer Development Credits?

Saturday, October 27th, 2007

Lately, TDCs (Transfer Development Credits) have been in the news in our area. TDCs were devised to allow local ranchers or farmers to keep their acreage untouched, if they have property they could develop. Instead, they may take those lots and arrange to transfer the development rights to a so-called Transfer Site, through sales to developers.

Transfer Sites are areas where the County decides more development can theoretically be built without destroying the character and atmosphere of a neighborhood. The rancher/farmer sells his credits to a developer, realizing a profit from his land, and the developer then obtains the right to split a property within the Transfer Site area and build on the lots thus created.

Next Week: Who Wins, Who Loses?

For more architectural advice and articles, to see one of our many projects, or to learn more about our office and the services we offer, go to our main website: Architect Atascadero